If you’re looking for income and poverty data… the Census has a new source for this data.

In 2010 the U.S. Census Bureau switched to the short form for the decennial census. This means they collected less data than in previous decades. Income, poverty, educational attainment, and other socioeconomic data were not collected in the 2010 Census. The Census Bureau now provides this socioeconomic data through its American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is an on–going survey of a sample of the population with new data released every year. Because the ACS is based on a sample of the population rather than a census of the entire population, the Census Bureau recommends using the ACS estimates to calculate percentages of the population and either publishing a margin of error for each ACS estimate or running statistical significance tests.

Neighborhood level socioeconomic data

The Census Bureau averages together five years of ACS data in order to create socioeconomic data for small geographies such as neighborhoods (technically called census block groups and census tracts). In December 2011, the Census Bureau released the 2006–2010 five–year ACS estimates. This is the first set of five–year data that was collected entirely from the post–Katrina time period. In late 2012, the Census Bureau will release the 2007–2011 five–year ACS estimates. And in late 2013, the Census Bureau will release the 2008–2012 five–year ACS estimates.

GNOCDC is studying how to interpret the new 2006–2010 five–year ACS estimates given that in 2006 the population of the city and region was greatly diminished. In the meantime, you may still want to check out the Census 2000 socioeconomic data presented by neighborhood on our pre–Katrina web site.

Go to our homepage — www.gnocdc.org

Look in the middle column and click on the link to “Pre–Katrina Data Center Web Site.”

Parish level socioeconomic data

The Census Bureau publishes parish level ACS data in two different formats. For the most populous parishes (such as Orleans, Jefferson, and St. Tammany), the Census Bureau provides both single–year and three–year ACS estimates. The single–year estimates are closer to a point–in–time estimate although data is still collected over a 12–month period. The three–year ACS estimates represent the average of data collected over a three–year time period. For less populous parishes (such as St. Bernard, Plaquemines, St. Charles, and St. John), only the three–year ACS estimates are available.

We’ve made a good deal of socioeconomic data for New Orleans and the metro area available through our “Who lives in New Orleans and the Metro Area Now?” This brief examines single–year 2010 data for Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany, and the metro area, and calculates statistically significant changes since 2000. Included are data on household income, poverty, educational attainment, access to vehicles, and the foreign born population. To access GNOCDC’s analysis and the data…

Go to our homepage — www.gnocdc.org

Look in the middle column and click on the link to “Who lives in New Orleans and the Metro Area Now?”